trail of footprints

Pada means foot or part of a poem and implies a step or passage in the course of one's spiritual or holistic life. Padajna is to know these sacred footprints, and pada-viya is the trail left by the pada journey.

I would not think to touch the sky with two arms -Sappho, fragment 52

Me: witchy, feminist, perfumer, curator, writer, former circus girl. reading poetry, studying dreams, exploring forests, reading tea leaves, watching birds, talking to the moon. curled up with tea & blankets.

A note: I prefer feed readers, so I'm probably following you there & not here.


Things to click on:

tagged personal posts // liked posts
films // books // music // + music // words // photos // feminist space // an old space // hogwarts // witchyness // bed of bones

posts tagged "ruins"

outdoormagic:

Hidden in the deep woods by RainerSchuetz on Flickr.
wasbella102:

Jarlshof: looking down into a round house
near to Sumburgh, Shetland Islands, Great Britain

The archaeological site at Jarlshof represents over 4,000 years of continual human habitation. The earliest remains are of Bronze Age buildings from around 2500-2000 BC; Iron Age round houses date from between 200 BC and AD 800; a Viking settlement from the 9th to 14th centuries stands towards the eastern side of the site; and finally the castle, the Laird’s House, stands in the centre of the site and was converted from a medieval farmhouse to a fortified residence in the 1500s.  Similarly to Skara Brae in Orkney, the Jarlshof site was hidden until a storm in the late 1800s expsed some of the remains. Archaeological work in the 1920s and 1940s/50s revealed the full extent of the site. Here, we stand on the top floor of Jarlshof: the Laird’s House and look west over the later Iron Age buildings, larger and more advanced than the earliest round houses on the opposite side. It is easy from here to appreciate the term ‘wheelhouse’ used for these buildings - built in circular fashion around a central hub with storage areas and small rooms leading off it.

wasbella102:

Jarlshof: looking down into a round house
near to Sumburgh, Shetland Islands, Great Britain
The archaeological site at Jarlshof represents over 4,000 years of continual human habitation. The earliest remains are of Bronze Age buildings from around 2500-2000 BC; Iron Age round houses date from between 200 BC and AD 800; a Viking settlement from the 9th to 14th centuries stands towards the eastern side of the site; and finally the castle, the Laird’s House, stands in the centre of the site and was converted from a medieval farmhouse to a fortified residence in the 1500s.

Similarly to Skara Brae in Orkney, the Jarlshof site was hidden until a storm in the late 1800s expsed some of the remains. Archaeological work in the 1920s and 1940s/50s revealed the full extent of the site.

Here, we stand on the top floor of Jarlshof: the Laird’s House and look west over the later Iron Age buildings, larger and more advanced than the earliest round houses on the opposite side. It is easy from here to appreciate the term ‘wheelhouse’ used for these buildings - built in circular fashion around a central hub with storage areas and small rooms leading off it.

(Source: attolences, via the-hanging-garden)

amazingwilderness:

Artist: Kilian Schönberger
asiwaswalkingallalone:

Spurrell’s Cross by terryjh on Flickr.
chinacat-crazycat:

randomeclectica:

Sheep and Standing Stone, Avebury, England
Photo: http://www.barryandersen.com; Photographer: Barry Andersen

ONLY IN ENGLAND. I mean goddamnit. 

chinacat-crazycat:

randomeclectica:

Sheep and Standing Stone, Avebury, England

Photo: http://www.barryandersen.com; Photographer: Barry Andersen

ONLY IN ENGLAND. I mean goddamnit. 

petitpoulailler:

off-with-the-faeries: ~Realm of the Fae~
Snowy Ruins of Karlsburg Castle’s watchtower. Karlsburg, Germany.
by mrdevlin (flickr)

Snowy Ruins of Karlsburg Castle’s watchtower. Karlsburg, Germany.

by mrdevlin (flickr)

(Source: destroyed-and-abandoned, via ahhr)

Priory moon (by YorkshireSam)

Priory moon (by YorkshireSam)

(via ahhr)

Nine Maidens (by alandebarker)

Nine Maidens (by alandebarker)

(via ahhr)

emeghration:

Callanish Standing Stones/Callanish I, Isle of Lewis, Scotland. At least 2600BC.

emeghration:

Callanish Standing Stones/Callanish I, Isle of Lewis, Scotland. At least 2600BC.

(via ahhr)

Martin ‘Cynicus' Anderson, Ruined Church at Night.

Martin ‘Cynicus' Anderson, Ruined Church at Night.

(Source: antitacta, via ahhr)

nihtern:

Pictish wolf from Stittenham, Inverness-shire.
Image source: finds.org.uk

Mists of Avalon has made me so fascinated with the Picts, which I recognize is totally unreasonable because that book is not an accurate representation of them. 

nihtern:

Pictish wolf from Stittenham, Inverness-shire.

Image source: finds.org.uk

Mists of Avalon has made me so fascinated with the Picts, which I recognize is totally unreasonable because that book is not an accurate representation of them. 

(via ahhr)

outdoormagic:

Hidden in the deep woods by RainerSchuetz on Flickr.

Glastonbury Abbey, May 2013. (photos by me, please don’t remove credit)

This was originally the site of the first church in England around 2000 years ago (a tiny mud-type building), which was replaced with a stone building around the 600s, which was further enlarged over the years. It became the wealthiest church in England, but was dissolved by Henry VIII in the 1500s & left to ruin.

Dartmoor photographs by Stu Jenks. First: “White Pony at Scorhill Circle”, second: “A Brown Pony Rubbing His Ass Against An Ancient Stone, A White Pony Scratching Her Neck Against Another.” About this one, he says: “This, in visual metaphor, pretty much expresses my spiritual belief of finding the balance between the sacred and the profane.”

(via Terri Windling)