trail of footprints

Pada means foot or part of a poem and implies a step or passage in the course of one's spiritual or holistic life. Padajna is to know these sacred footprints, and pada-viya is the trail left by the pada journey.

I would not think to touch the sky with two arms -Sappho, fragment 52

Me: witchy, feminist, perfumer, curator, writer, former circus girl. reading poetry, studying dreams, exploring forests, reading tea leaves, watching birds, talking to the moon. curled up with tea & blankets.

A note: I prefer feed readers, so I'm probably following you there & not here.


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posts tagged "england"

Stunning Aerial Images of Hill Forts from Britain's Iron Age ↘

(Source: pagansquare, via charlottesarahscrivener)

View of the Glastonbury Tor from Chalice Well gardens. Sitting on a covered swing on a drizzly morning, listening to the birds. May 2013.

The soundtrack is a layering of the original sounds (wind & birds), the churchyard in Chagford where I’d been a few days before (church bells & birds), & a recording of people changing at the Glastonbury Abbey ruins.

Tor View from Chalice Well Gardens

View of the Tor from Chalice Well gardens. Sitting on a covered swing on a drizzly morning, listening to the birds. May 2013.

The soundtrack is a layering of the original sounds (wind & birds), the churchyard in Chagford where I’d been a few days before (church bells & birds), & a recording of people changing at the Glastonbury Abbey ruins.

oldkingcrow:

I’ve been kind of obsessed with early medieval British history lately.  I mean, you have the Romans building a wall and trading posts on the Scottish border, trying to keep the barbarians at bay.  But the Picts were probably this fairly sophisticated culture, with bright, garish clothes, and elaborate art and architecture, and then MacBeth and his people came in and killed them all.  

And then the Saxons are on the scene, and it’s all these Germanic tribes intermingling with the Celts, and there are these Viking Kings with fantastic names like Cnut the Great and Sven Forkbeard.  And every corner of the British Isles has it’s own dialect of Old English, and there’s all this tension between Polytheism and Christianity, and Grendel is out there eating Norsemen or something.

And then all these Normans show up and kick out all the Anglo-Saxon nobility, and for about three centuries, the common folk speak Old English, but the royalty speak French, and may not actually have a great grasp on English at all, and that’s why our legal system is full of words like “prosecutor”  and “nullification” and “jury” and we say “Attorney General” instead of “General Attorney.”

It’s like Game of Thrones with less CGI and gratuitous T&A.

May 2013, along the River Teign in Dartmoor.

Chagford, Dartmoor, May 2013.

On the down outside of Chagford. I wanted to capture the sense of remoteness. It’s actually very quiet except for the wind, which sounds horrible on recordings, so I’ve replaced it with a recording of birds & church bells outside the ancient church in Chagford.

Outside Chagford, Dartmoor, May 2013.

Starting at 23seconds in is where faeries tried to lure me off the path.

Faeries: … jamie … jaaaaaamie …
Me: (suspiciously) yeeees?
Faeries: come play with us!
Me: oh my, I think it’s best I stay on the path. I know you saw me pick a couple wildflowers earlier.
Faeries: but look how old these trees are, & listen to the bird song! We bet you want to know what the trees & birds are saying, right? The trees sing their songs so slowly, much more slowly here than where you’re from. Creaks & moans take years here. But the birds listen, & their entire lives are just little pieces of the trees’ songs, & the birds pass down those pieces through the generations. But each species hears & passes down different pieces, & it’s such a confusing mess to weave it all back together with charts & compasses & interpreters … but we know it all. We know the song since the beginning. & if you step off the path, we’ll share it all with you. & Jamie, it’s worth hearing. We promise.
Me: … Can you come here & tell it to me?
Faeries: you know it doesn’t work that way. No risk, no reward.
Me: the ground is full of nettles, & I don’t trust faeries.

the-hanging-garden:

The 5,000-year-old Neolithic carvings of concentric circles, interlocking rings and hollowed cups were uncovered as part of a four-year English Heritage-funded initiative, in partnership with Northumberland and Durham County Councils, to record and publish online all the prehistoric rock art within the region Picture: English Heritage

the-hanging-garden:

The 5,000-year-old Neolithic carvings of concentric circles, interlocking rings and hollowed cups were uncovered as part of a four-year English Heritage-funded initiative, in partnership with Northumberland and Durham County Councils, to record and publish online all the prehistoric rock art within the region Picture: English Heritage

allthingseurope:

Chatsworth House, England (by Tracey Whitefoot)

allthingseurope:

Chatsworth House, England (by Tracey Whitefoot)

May 2013, just outside of Chagford in Dartmoor, climbing Butterdon Down.

"A more cheerful legend concerns the rock-capped hills close by my own small village [Chagford]. One of these hills [this hill] rises steeply above the village Commons, a green swath of land where wild mares come down from the moor to give birth in the spring, rabbits congregate at dawn, and neighbors walk their dogs at dusk. The hill was said to be bare of stone until King Arthur stood up on it and challenged the Devil to a hurling match. The Devil stood on a second hill, and quoits were hurled back and forth. King Arthur won and the Devil, enraged, turned those great quoits into stone. The stone tors crown the hills today, watching over the houses below."
—Terri Windling, from an article on Dartmoor

ahhr:

Museum of Witchcraft, Boscastle.

ahhr:

Museum of Witchcraft, Boscastle.

sonte-ileana:

Glastonbury Tor, Somerset, England

sonte-ileana:

Glastonbury Tor, Somerset, England

(via avalonaddict)

buron:

Tintagel Pilgrim (9)
©buron - June ‘14

buron:

Tintagel Pilgrim (9)

©buron - June ‘14

(via ahhr)

Wild Ponies with Foals in the Moors

May 2013. Wild ponies, north of Princetown in Dartmoor, getting deeper into the moors.

Moorland is beautiful. Light plays on it like a painting.

Moorlands are usually pretty quiet & don’t have so many birds chirping in the background; these birds are from a recording made in Chagford the next day.

fuckyeahpaganism:

It is one of the greatest mysteries of the Isle of Avalon that two different healing springs, one touched red with iron, the other white with calcite, should rise within a few feet of each other from the caverns beneath Glastonbury Tor. Both have healing in their flow, and the one depicted is called the Glastonbury White Spring. 
[x]

fuckyeahpaganism:

It is one of the greatest mysteries of the Isle of Avalon that two different healing springs, one touched red with iron, the other white with calcite, should rise within a few feet of each other from the caverns beneath Glastonbury Tor. Both have healing in their flow, and the one depicted is called the Glastonbury White Spring. 

[x]

(via faerypotter)