trail of footprints

Pada means foot or part of a poem and implies a step or passage in the course of one's spiritual or holistic life. Padajna is to know these sacred footprints, and pada-viya is the trail left by the pada journey.

I would not think to touch the sky with two arms -Sappho, fragment 52

Me: witchy, feminist, perfumer, curator, writer, former circus girl. reading poetry, studying dreams, exploring forests, reading tea leaves, watching birds, talking to the moon. curled up with tea & blankets.

A note: I prefer feed readers, so I'm probably following you there & not here.


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films // books // music // + music // words // photos // feminist space // an old space // hogwarts // witchyness // bed of bones

"The great lesson from the true mystics, from the zen monks, from the humanistic and transpersonal psychologists, is that the sacred is in the ordinary, that it is to be found in one’s daily life, in one’s neighbors, friends, and family, in one’s own back yard. This lesson can be easily lost. To be looking elsewhere for miracles is to me a sure sign of ignorance that everything is miraculous."

- Abraham Maslow. Pilfered from the Mighty River. (via crashinglybeautiful)
graveyarddirt:

New Feature, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt
A new feature appears along an old path.

graveyarddirt:

New Feature, by Ms. Graveyard Dirt

A new feature appears along an old path.

thenewenlightenmentage:
Galaxies That Are Too Big To Fail, But Fail Anyway
Dark matter exists, but there is still a lot we don’t know about it. Presumably it’s some kind of particle, but we don’t know how massive it is, what forces it interacts with, or how it was produced. On the other hand, there’s actually a lot we do know about the dark matter. We know how much of it there is; we know roughly where it is; we know that it’s “cold,” meaning that the average particle’s velocity is much less than the speed of light; and we know that dark matter particles don’t interact very strongly with each other. Which is quite a bit of knowledge, when you think about it.
Fortunately, astronomers are pushing forward to study how dark matter behaves as it’s scattered through the universe, and the results are interesting. We start with a very basic idea: that dark matter is cold and completely non-interacting, or at least has interactions (the strength with which dark matter particles scatter off of each other) that are too small to make any noticeable difference. This is a well-defined and predictive model: ΛCDM, which includes the cosmological constant (Λ) as well as the cold dark matter (CDM). We can compare astronomical observations to ΛCDM predictions to see if we’re on the right track.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Galaxies That Are Too Big To Fail, But Fail Anyway

Dark matter exists, but there is still a lot we don’t know about it. Presumably it’s some kind of particle, but we don’t know how massive it is, what forces it interacts with, or how it was produced. On the other hand, there’s actually a lot we do know about the dark matter. We know how much of it there is; we know roughly where it is; we know that it’s “cold,” meaning that the average particle’s velocity is much less than the speed of light; and we know that dark matter particles don’t interact very strongly with each other. Which is quite a bit of knowledge, when you think about it.

Fortunately, astronomers are pushing forward to study how dark matter behaves as it’s scattered through the universe, and the results are interesting. We start with a very basic idea: that dark matter is cold and completely non-interacting, or at least has interactions (the strength with which dark matter particles scatter off of each other) that are too small to make any noticeable difference. This is a well-defined and predictive model: ΛCDM, which includes the cosmological constant (Λ) as well as the cold dark matter (CDM). We can compare astronomical observations to ΛCDM predictions to see if we’re on the right track.

Continue Reading

(via technicolorgypsy)


Titan, aka the Mermaid Moon.

Titan, aka the Mermaid Moon.

(Source: featherandarrow, via lorrafae)

Craggy Lake Erie.
#lakeerie http://ift.tt/1n9bLjW

Craggy Lake Erie.
#lakeerie http://ift.tt/1n9bLjW

My mom. http://ift.tt/1zWEuOG
Early mornings at King’s Cross Circle.
#uoft http://ift.tt/1qhSkJq

Early mornings at King’s Cross Circle.
#uoft http://ift.tt/1qhSkJq

Stunning Aerial Images of Hill Forts from Britain's Iron Age ↘

(Source: pagansquare, via charlottesarahscrivener)

View of the Glastonbury Tor from Chalice Well gardens. Sitting on a covered swing on a drizzly morning, listening to the birds. May 2013.

The soundtrack is a layering of the original sounds (wind & birds), the churchyard in Chagford where I’d been a few days before (church bells & birds), & a recording of people changing at the Glastonbury Abbey ruins.

Tor View from Chalice Well Gardens

View of the Tor from Chalice Well gardens. Sitting on a covered swing on a drizzly morning, listening to the birds. May 2013.

The soundtrack is a layering of the original sounds (wind & birds), the churchyard in Chagford where I’d been a few days before (church bells & birds), & a recording of people changing at the Glastonbury Abbey ruins.

10 Ways to Make Your House a Home ↘

Derek Sheffield

Published in the May/June & July/August 2014 issue of Orion magazine

1. While the lenders and realtors and brokers circulate their dreary forms, while your only claim to the house is wonder, get the seller to let you till and plant before the closing date. All those buds and shoots will spell welcome in the green language of the garden.

2. Get to know your neighbors. Learn their names, even if you have to look them up: the snowberry brushing against the backside of the outbuilding; a purple finch flitting its shadow across the creek where brook trout scatter; a bushy-tailed woodrat hunched in a corner of the garden shed; stink bugs crammed in every conceivable crevice around every door and window.

3. You won’t like some of your neighbors. That’s natural. Mutual, even. Learn all you can about them, then attack. Pull so much knapweed from the packed earth that its shapes pinwheel before your closed eyes when you look for sleep. Buy a BB gun for the starlings, and watch the BBs bounce harmlessly off their oily plumes. Know fear at their dark intelligence when a decade passes and you realize they never tried your feeder again.

4. Figure out what your land would like where. Plant some natives with the many nectar-lickers and berry-gobblers in mind. When your red osier dogwood grows tall enough for a Say’s phoebe to perch in it, you almost wince at the spindly clutch of her talons. And when two yellow warblers build their nest in the black cottonwood you planted by the creek, you have an inkling of what it is to be a father.

5. When your daughter is born, brave the odd looks from the nurses and ask for the placenta. Take it home in a sack marked BIOHAZARD, and plant it in the soil where two saplings grow. In three years, when your daughter climbs into your car to play with the stick shift and the car starts rolling toward the steep bank above the creek, those lodgepole pines will be just strong enough to bend, bend, and hold.

6. When your daughter, hopping from foot to foot, asks if she can go potty outside, say, “Sure.” After she calls, “Okay,” try not to exclaim when you turn to find two logs steaming on the lawn, but take your shovel, scoop her scat, and toss it into the thimbleberry bushes. You’ll have forgotten all about it next summer when you pick and eat those rosy, seedy berries.

7. When you hear the great-horned owl calling, take your daughter out into the night. Listen with her, and let the certainty of a second child bloom in the whos.

8. When your daughters run to you, calling excitedly about a frog or praying mantis, push aside whatever work lies before you, and show them by your keen interest that what they have discovered is the real work. Let them take down your field guide and flip the pages. Let their wonder feed your own.

9. Among all the tasks the place asks of you, don’t forget to hear it asking you to simply be in it. Let your children drag you out to the lawn for a picnic. Lie down and feel the knobs and dips of the ground against your back. Every time the train blows its horn, gather your family in your thoughts and feel more fully where you are.

10. And when circumstances make you leave that home, rise at dawn of the last day it is legally yours, shovel into a five-gallon bucket that placenta-rich soil that now includes your dog’s ashes. Let it help you begin again. Let it help you be what your new home needs.

Farley Mowat's Passing ↘

Along with many other Canadians, I was saddened to hear of the passing of Farley Mowat at the beginning of May, shortly before his 93rd birthday.  I’ve always enjoyed his books, whether he was writing about Arctic wildlife or his traumatic experiences as a combat soldier during World War II.  Mowat had a Canadian sense of humor and always treated with respect the creatures he observed and the landscape.  He also defended the environment, untiring even in the most tiring predicaments.

A few years ago, Saturday Night Magazine published some nitpicking triviality in regard to how sometimes verifiable facts and Mowat’s writings didn’t always match.  In response he declared that, “his métier lay somewhere in between what was then a grey void between fact and fiction.”[1]  His answer was sound.  Ultimately, he told stories well, and like any other writer he used settings familiar to him.  Who cares if The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be lacks a certificate of authenticity?  Farley Mowat’s a superior writer because he eludes anybody confining him into fiction or non-fiction categories.

Altogether, like Maya Angelou, when I heard both had passed I said, “I know they were old, but some people ought to live forever.” 

 - S. Noël McKay, author of Stony Point (fall 2014)



[1] “Farley Mowat Dead at 92: Award Winning Author was also a noted Environmentalist: CBC News Web Article posted May 7, 2014

dianaandpansson:

"Magic: Clover is one of the oldest cultivated plants. It has been used both medicinally and magically since ancient times. Although modern folklore has this three-leaved plant being associated with the Christian Holy Trinity, the association of plants with three leaves goes much further back into Pagan times.  The ancient Greeks and Romans associated it with their triple Goddesses and the Celts considered it a sacred symbol of the Sun. It is the national flower of Ireland, but the association with St. Patrick is actually more modern. In folk magic Red Clover is used in a ritual bath to attract money and prosperity to the bather and is also used as a floorwash to chase out evil and unwanted ghosts. White Clover is used for breaking curses and is worn as a sachet or put in the four corners or a house or someone’s property to achieve this. The four-leaf clover is a very famous good luck charm believed to protect from evil spirits, witches, disease, and the evil eye. This familiar childhood rhyme for a four-leaf clover actually originates from the Middle Ages:
One leaf for fame, one leaf for wealth, One for a faithful lover, And one leaf to bring glorious health, Are all in a four-leaf clover 

All of these together are supposed to give one the happiest and most fulfilling life possible. Four-leaf clovers are also traditionally used to see fairies and other spirits, to heal illnesses, and to avoid being drafted into the military. Three leaved-clovers are worn as a protective talisman and two-leaved clovers are used by young women to get a glimpse of a future lover. With its three leaves, Clover is a very shamanic plant allowing one to see into and interact with the Otherworld. It is a good talisman of protection and power for traveling out of body and walking between worlds. Never underestimate the magical power of this simple and harmless weed. It also makes a good offering to Mercurial deities and can be burned as a herbal incense, added to alcoholic brews, or left with a food offering.
Medicine: Clovers are very good for both your health and your livestock animals’ health (if you have any). They are rich in nutrients and vitamins and the leaves and flowers can be added to salads or used as garnish. Use the new green leaves when eating them raw, but you can also add the tougher older leaves to sautéed or steamed greens like spinach and kale. You can even add the leaves into stir fries, soups, and pasta sauces, but add them last and just cook until wilted to retain the nutrients. Even the roots can be eaten when cooked. You can batter and fry Clover flowers just like Elder flowers.  The flowers of both types of clover can be used to make homemade wines. Red Clover flowers are steeped to make a popular tea which, although drunk for pleasure, can be used to treat liver and gallbladder issues, stomach and digestive issues, as well as for women’s menstrual and fertility issues.”
– Sarah Anne Lawless

It’s excellent in a general health tea for women.

dianaandpansson:

"Magic: Clover is one of the oldest cultivated plants. It has been used both medicinally and magically since ancient times. Although modern folklore has this three-leaved plant being associated with the Christian Holy Trinity, the association of plants with three leaves goes much further back into Pagan times.  The ancient Greeks and Romans associated it with their triple Goddesses and the Celts considered it a sacred symbol of the Sun. It is the national flower of Ireland, but the association with St. Patrick is actually more modern. In folk magic Red Clover is used in a ritual bath to attract money and prosperity to the bather and is also used as a floorwash to chase out evil and unwanted ghosts. White Clover is used for breaking curses and is worn as a sachet or put in the four corners or a house or someone’s property to achieve this. The four-leaf clover is a very famous good luck charm believed to protect from evil spirits, witches, disease, and the evil eye. This familiar childhood rhyme for a four-leaf clover actually originates from the Middle Ages:

One leaf for fame, one leaf for wealth,
One for a faithful lover,
And one leaf to bring glorious health,
Are all in a four-leaf clover

Four-leaf Clover

All of these together are supposed to give one the happiest and most fulfilling life possible. Four-leaf clovers are also traditionally used to see fairies and other spirits, to heal illnesses, and to avoid being drafted into the military. Three leaved-clovers are worn as a protective talisman and two-leaved clovers are used by young women to get a glimpse of a future lover. With its three leaves, Clover is a very shamanic plant allowing one to see into and interact with the Otherworld. It is a good talisman of protection and power for traveling out of body and walking between worlds. Never underestimate the magical power of this simple and harmless weed. It also makes a good offering to Mercurial deities and can be burned as a herbal incense, added to alcoholic brews, or left with a food offering.

Medicine: Clovers are very good for both your health and your livestock animals’ health (if you have any). They are rich in nutrients and vitamins and the leaves and flowers can be added to salads or used as garnish. Use the new green leaves when eating them raw, but you can also add the tougher older leaves to sautéed or steamed greens like spinach and kale. You can even add the leaves into stir fries, soups, and pasta sauces, but add them last and just cook until wilted to retain the nutrients. Even the roots can be eaten when cooked. You can batter and fry Clover flowers just like Elder flowers.  The flowers of both types of clover can be used to make homemade wines. Red Clover flowers are steeped to make a popular tea which, although drunk for pleasure, can be used to treat liver and gallbladder issues, stomach and digestive issues, as well as for women’s menstrual and fertility issues.”

– Sarah Anne Lawless

It’s excellent in a general health tea for women.

(via charlottesarahscrivener)

mnic313:

Dead Flowers Series by.L. (Ling).

(Source: galasai, via sweetpotatopig)

One of the kitties who lives at Sweetpeas, sitting in the store window. http://ift.tt/1kpIBbY

One of the kitties who lives at Sweetpeas, sitting in the store window. http://ift.tt/1kpIBbY